Search Results

13 bookmark(s) - Sort by: Date ↓ / Title /

  1. The emergence of active learning classrooms (ALCs) on university campuses introduces a need for university teachers to have knowledge of the pedagogical use of physical space. We consider expanding two well-known frameworks for teacher knowledge. Pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) describes teacher knowledge about teaching discipline-specific content. Technological, pedagogical, and content knowledge (TPACK) recognizes digital technology as part of the knowledge base. With increased attention on learning spaces, we propose redefining technology to include non-digital technologies, (e.g. furniture, whiteboards). Further, we add “environment” to the knowledge base to address rhetorical communications from both the physical space and the classroom climate.
    http://libjournal.uncg.edu/jls/article/download/1834/1343
    by dnorman (2019-06-20)
  2. The Twitter data suggests that the tech industry may have begrudgingly found a way to listen when women talk about their experiences as women in the industry, but hasn’t yet afforded them equal attention in the broader conversation about technology and business.
    http://recode.net/2015/09/08/twitter-...en-talk-tech-and-women-talk-diversity
    Tags: , , by dnorman (2015-09-10)
  3. While the benefits of lecture capture and the flipped classroom model have caught widespread attention in higher ed, it is crucial to note its risks—particularly in the area of privacy and copyright violations.

    FERPA noncompliance can result in the loss of federal funding, while copyright infringement could lead to costly civil or even criminal penalties. Recorded lectures released to the public could bring unwanted attention to a school—as in the February case of a guest speaker at the University of Wisconsin-Whitewater, whose lecture was picked up by conservative media and called “anti-Republican.”
    http://www.universitybusiness.com/article/lecture-capture-privacy-please
    Tags: , , by dnorman (2014-06-11)
  4. Why should a young man listen to an old guy about the best way to become a man? Because the typical teen is not yet able to see a future past the next few months. That’s not a fault of character, but the fact that teens’ brains have not yet physically matured. The pre-fontal cortex (PFC) does not fully develop in most people until they’re twenty-four years old. Yet, the PFC is responsible for regulating mood, attention span, impulse control, and the ability to plan ahead and understand the consequences of one’s actions. In the meantime, it’s up to the adults to guide them by showing them possible consequences—good and bad—of their behavior. With that in mind, here’s my guide to becoming a man:
    http://www.esquire.com/blogs/news/kareem-how-to-become-a-man
    Tags: by dnorman (2013-10-23)
  5. -
    http://blogs.hbr.org/bregman/2010/05/how-and-why-to-stop-multitaski.html
    Tags: , by dnorman (2010-06-05)
  6. -
    http://www.danah.org/papers/talks/Web2Expo.html
  7. -
    http://nymag.com/news/features/56793
    Tags: , , , by dnorman (2009-05-20)
  8. -
    http://continuouspartialattention.jot.com/WikiHome
  9. -
    http://news.com.com/Why+cant+you+pay+...tion+anymore/2008-1022_3-5637632.html
    Tags: , , , , , by dnorman (2006-04-16)
  10. -
    http://blogs.msdn.com/alexbarn/archive/2006/01/22/516000.aspx
    Tags: , , by dnorman (2006-01-23)

Top of the page

First / Previous / Next / Last / Page 1 of 2

About - Propulsed by SemanticScuttle