dnorman: discourse analysis*

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  1. Of course Homer ranks first: he’s the undisputed most iconic character, and he accounts for 21% of the show’s 1.3 million words spoken through season 26. Marge, Bart, and Lisa—in that order—combine for another 26%, giving the Simpson family a 47% share of the show’s dialogue.

    If we exclude the Simpson nuclear family and focus on the top 50 supporting characters, the results become a bit less predictable, if not exactly surprising.
    http://toddwschneider.com/posts/the-simpsons-by-the-data
  2. -
    http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10...635143.2014.942621?journalCode=crst20
  3. Conversations on Twitter create networks with identifiable contours as people reply to and mention one another in their tweets. These conversational structures differ, depending on the subject and the people driving the conversation. Six structures are regularly observed: divided, unified, fragmented, clustered, and inward and outward hub and spoke structures. These are created as individuals choose whom to reply to or mention in their Twitter messages and the structures tell a story about the nature of the conversation.
    http://www.pewinternet.org/2014/02/20...arch%2FSocial%2Bnetwork%2Banalysis%2F

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